anne. twenty two. MA candidate currently in the midst of a year long journey around the world.


(Source: theultradork, via shouldnt)

luaren:

honestly can’t wait for the 50 shades movie to normalize the manipulation of lower-level female employees.  can’t wait for the new wave of “consent is sexy” banners on the cover of cosmo.  can’t wait for teen girls to think that a controlling relationship is romantic.  can’t wait for sexualized violence to become increasingly mainstream.  and most of all, i can’t wait for bdsm to be labeled a feminist revolution

(via forgotthestorm)

caelas:

saying feminism is unnecessary because you don’t feel oppressed is like saying fire extinguishers are unnecessary because your house isn’t on fire

(via forgotthestorm)

(Source: globzillas, via thefuuuucomics)

A woman from the audience asks: ‘Why were there so few women among the Beat writers?’ and [Gregory] Corso, suddenly utterly serious, leans forward and says: “There were women, they were there, I knew them, their families put them in institutions, they were given electric shock. In the ’50s if you were male you could be a rebel, but if you were female your families had you locked up.
written by Stephen Scobie, on the Naropa Institute’s 1994 tribute to Allen Ginsberg (via fuckyeahbeatniks)

(via transactionswithbeauty)

asylum-art:

Street Art by ROA

(via theend-of)


thesnicketfile:

If you ever need a letter of excuse signed by Lemony Snicket, here you go.

thesnicketfile:

If you ever need a letter of excuse signed by Lemony Snicket, here you go.

(Source: lemonysnicketlibrary.com, via sensuous-witch)

american-radical:

Palestinian solidarity from Mexico. X

(via brutalej)

pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 16, 1951: The Catcher in the Rye is Published
On this day in 1951, J.D. Salinger’s novel, The Catcher in the Rye, was published. The novel tells the story of 16-year-old Holden Caulfield, a troubled character who challenged 1950s conformity, much like Salinger himself.
Due to its somewhat rebellious tone, Salinger’s work has been linked to issues of controversy and censorship.  Even so, over 60 years later, The Catcher in the Rye has sold over 65 million copies and continues to sell an additional 500,000 each year.
Learn about the novel’s path to publication with American Masters’ J. D. Salinger infographic.
Photo:  A 1951 copy of J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye (Rare Book and Special Collections Division, Library of Congress). 

pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 16, 1951: The Catcher in the Rye is Published

On this day in 1951, J.D. Salinger’s novel, The Catcher in the Rye, was published. The novel tells the story of 16-year-old Holden Caulfield, a troubled character who challenged 1950s conformity, much like Salinger himself.

Due to its somewhat rebellious tone, Salinger’s work has been linked to issues of controversy and censorship.  Even so, over 60 years later, The Catcher in the Rye has sold over 65 million copies and continues to sell an additional 500,000 each year.

Learn about the novel’s path to publication with American Masters’ J. D. Salinger infographic.

Photo:  A 1951 copy of J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye (Rare Book and Special Collections Division, Library of Congress). 

(via npr)

neopetcemetery:

the flawless diversity of fox news anchors

neopetcemetery:

the flawless diversity of fox news anchors

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)